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? >> well, i can't imagine why anyone would think that. i don't think vice presidents should come down from anything. only two officers in the land were elected by all the people, the president and the vice president i have never known any majority or senator willing to serve as vice president if his people are willing to elect him. >> nobody thought johnson was the sending most powerful man then. "life" magazine quoted the no. 2 man in washington talking about the president's brother, robert kennedy, perhaps lbj's most bitter rival in all of washington. in all of politics. of course, to call them rivals suggested in the days before fate made him president, lbj was in the same league as bobby kennedy when it came to power, clout, significance. when it came to having a political future. >> that would have been a gross distortion of the concept of a rivalry. months later safely ensconced in the white house, lbj smoke e spoke of the misery he had felt as vice president. >> i did an independent senate, the cabinet had employees under your jurisdiction here. >> all right. >> i don't think that a
. it actually makes perfect sense from the standpoint of both parties that they don't right now because we are caught in a trap. this has to do with something we saw on this show a lot. over the last generation or two, the two parties have sorted themselves out id logically. the republicans are the conservative party. the democrats the left of center party. the american people sorted themselves out, too. parties these days are almost like try, there are deep, clear, obviously cultural geographic racial and id logic divisions that separate the public party and the democratic party. just about every voter decide which side of that divide they're on. >> that old notion of moderate swing voters jumping back and forth between the two party. >> that doesn't happen much anymore. those two parties with those vast deep lines of division separating them. they have since 2010 been forced to share power in washington. democrats have the white house in the senate. now throw in this. it's not just the republicans are the conservative party and the democrats the liberal party, republicans have moved much
. here in just the dallas area, 133,000 people who don't currently have health insurance would immediately get health insurance, without even having to go through the website if the state of texas decided to do it. >> but this is the tea party era. this is texas. so not surprising outside that event there were protesters tweaking president obama. democrats in general are fighting a long war here. it seems that for the foreseeable future, being poor in red state america and poor in blue state america will mean very different levels of service all because of our polarized politics. we will talk about all of this with a policy reporter for politico.com. a political correspondent for national journal, nbc correspondent. steve kornacki, last minute. jeremy peters, politics reporter from the new york times. thank you for joining us. i guess we start with that. we placed jack lew a week after the supreme court ruling came down in june of 2012. i think the conventional wis come he was expressing was, yeah, sure, technically the courts allowed the states could opt out. there will be an
to happen. sadly i don't know where immigration reform is. a lot of issues that should be moving forward, that aren't. look, i know john bane, i know him very well. i know john is very sensitive to this issue. but in john's defense, first of all, it has been a pretty tough year, i think the caucus has been very divided and brutally divided. i don't miss those conferences, i can imagine right now it is like a rugby scrum inside, behind the closed doors. >> is this something you would vote for if you were -- >> i did vote for it, yes. i'm a supporter of enda. >> what do you think -- you know john boehner a little bit. i've heard this about a number of issues with john boehner, if it was a private ballot, he would be for it, he would be fine with it. do you view it that way, he's just nervous about ticking off the right so much and losing his job, but otherwise he would be fine with it. >> i don't want to speak for john bane, i don't want to say what he would do with the bill and how he would vote, but he's been very sensitive to me, i've been pro gay rights my entire career, he came to me
being discussed go far enough. pointed out that they don't even, quote, require iran to even meet the terms the prior u.n. security council resolutions. so how significant is the temporary agreement reached today in geneva? the very fact that an agreement has been reached after ten years of negotiations and more than three decades of authoritarian rule in iran, is that by itself significant enough? to discuss this wasn't to bring in now mark jacobson, senior advicer to the truman national security project, which trains leaders on national security issues. mark, i know you support this deal. i guess you're here to say this morning, yeah, the sanctions worked and we're getting something real because of it. >> well, we have a significant first step here at challenging iranian sincerity. you summarized it perfectly. not only is this going to be -- this has brought the iranians into the game, but we now have a situation where we can verify iranian sincerity. there will be an inspection regime, there will be steps the iranians have to take and the genius to this is if it doesn't work, i
the existing seats. and it is also a demonstration of why republicans don't. anyone who watched schoolhouse rock as a kid knows there are three branches of the u.s. government, the executive, the legislative, the judicial. it turns out right now the executive and legislative branches are waged in a battle to do all they can to tip the scales of justice. well, the talk about this, want to bring in lynn sweet, the washington bureau chief for "the chicago sun-times," msnbc contributor perry bacon jr., the politics editor at the thegrio.com. edward mcmorris-santoro with buzzfeed.com and elahe izadi for "national journal." so i guess wasn't to start with this, the idea of court packing. because we're hearing it over and over again from republicans, you have chuck grassley actually introduced legislation that would permanently shrink the size of the d.c. circuit, do away with these three open seats. it is just amazing to me hearing that rhetoric and knowing the story of fdr, knowing the origins of the term court packing. i'm baffled at face value when i hear that, how anybody could look at trying
numbers are not all that unusual t. dwrd that most people don't sign up until they are absolutely forced to and even then at the very last minute. under romney-care in massachusetts, in many ways, this was the template of the affordable care act. this is where things stood after one month, 123 people have seened up. granted, it is one state, there are 34 states using the federal obama care website. that's about one-third of 1%. after otwo months in massachusetts, just 2,300 people have enrolled. it was only after 11 months under the threat of a penalty about to be imposed that more than 36,000 people in massachusetts would go on to enroll. most of them didn't enroll until that 11-month mark. so obama care can work. it won't kick in until the end of next march, five months from now. getting it to work depends on getting the problems ironed out and getting americans of all ages signed up. the obama administration needs to straighten out the political mess it's created. it's not just one future cabinet secretary at stake. this is the fate of the democratic party and beyond it is tied to whe
not it all the way to the supreme court. republicans told americans in the 2012, you don't like the law, here's your chance to get rid of it once and for all. vote against the democrats, vote for us. the democrats survived all of that, their law. obama care survived all that and still to this day, republicans continue to oppose that law uniformly and unanimously. you have to goult aback to before the civil war to the days of the kansas-nebraska act to find the law once adopted by congress and signed by a president was unanimously continuously attacked, litigated and not for as long as republicans have now attacked, litigated and not the affordable care act. and now, now, republicans have some new ammunition. they have some real political ammunition. the former launch of obama care was october 1st. since then, the rollout has been an unmitigated disaster. the website problems were, the website problems are, bad enough. the president's admission that the claim he made in selling the law back in 2010, the promise that everyone who liked their policy could keep their policy, did not end up being
right now? >> i really couldn't say. really. right now i just don't know what to do. i don't even know where to go what to say. nothing. >> so it was, half a century ago, the nation absorbed this massive shock, assembled around television sets, huddled around the nearest radio, drawn by word that kennedy had been shot. to learn together its young and vibrant president was gone. here with me to talk about that day is robert mcneil, the young nbc news correspondent we referred to in the clips, also the former executive editor and co-anchor of pbs' mcneil news hour. walter maiers, pulitzer prize winning reporter for the associated press who covered every presidential campaign from 1960 to the year 2000, and shirley franklin, former democratic mayor of atlanta and the recipient of the jfk profile in courage award. thank you for joining us today. i think there is a lot of memories for all of you and a lot of emotions, just in watching all of that. i'll start with you, robert. we relied so much on your reporting. i wonder if first you can just sort of take us back to that day, and to the cli
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

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